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exhibition

CLUB 57

Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, and Sophie Cavoulacos, Assistant Curator,
Department of Film; with Ann Magnuson, guest curator.
The Museum of Modern Art | 18 West 54 Street | Manhattan | Oct 31, 2017 – Apr 1, 2018
link https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/3824?locale=de
moma title club57 show

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the global public’s imagination. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition to fully examine the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of this seminal downtown New York alternative space. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57’s founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of interdisciplinary endeavor. Responding to the broad range of programming at Club 57, the exhibition will present their accomplishments across a range of disciplines—from film, video, performance, and theater to photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, collage, zines, fashion design, and curating. Building on extensive research and oral history, the exhibition features many works that have not been exhibited publicly since the 1980s.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Generous funding is provided by mediaThe foundation inc.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Film Fund. Leadership contributions are provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Steven Tisch, Blavatnik Family Foundation, and Ana and Henry Pincus. Major support is provided by Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP), The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Ken Kuchin and Tyler Morgan, Nion T. McEvoy, Michael S. Ovitz, Karen and Gary Winnick, and the Yuval Brisker Charitable Foundation.
 

CONTRIBUTIONS BY CLAYTON PATTERSON   

Peter Kwaloff and Gerard Little (Mr. Fashion), with Daphne Hellman, performance at Pyramid Club. 1986. Video
Peter Kwaloff and Kennon Raines, performance at Pyramid Club. 1987. Video
Peter Kwaloff as Nacha Cheap, performance at Pyramid Club. 1987. Video
Peter Kwaloff and Lady Bunny, performance at Pyramid Club. 1987. Video
Peter Kwaloff, Gerard Little (Mr. Fashion), and Stephen Tashjian (Tabbool), performance. 1988. Video
Peter Kwaloff and Gerard Little, performance. 1988.
Video Peter Kwaloff, performance at Pyramid Club. 1988. Video
Tompkins Square Park Police Riot. 1989. Video

COMMENT BY CLAYTON PATTERSON: One of my hopes is to have Peter Kwaloff SUNPK, and Nelson Sullivan be discovered as the true geniuses they truly were.  

Soon, hopefully will be finished a tattoo anthology have been working on for quite some time. One goal in this book is to open up to others a few  undiscovered and rare talents that have never seen the light of day, if the more mainstream world can be considered day or even light.  For example: Rev R.O. Tyler - went with Keith Patchel to the Tyler Printer Matter show. Keith discovered an original music composition - after some research and time - Kieth has almost been stunned at the musical vision produced by Tyler.. btw  Keith played with Richard Lloyd on his Field of Fire Album, Juilliard, his MARS Band played at Hayden Planetarium, created and performed a chamber opera piece Plain of Jars.  

ACKERS  - In terms of a tree of creative connections - if one lays out all of the ACKER recipients on a grid - it is interesting how many connections can be made - add in the bios - the boxes - will open many doors for researchers.   Then if I ever get my archive together and somewhere - for a particular unique stream much outside the mainstream info can be discovered - - the obscure - the adventurous - the wild ones - the outlaws - as well as the assholes and the shit-heads will also be found.. 

MOMA..Club 57 show- 

BTW- Daphne Hellman - played her harp at the Tattoo Society of NY (TSNY) - she was a trip.. loved Daphne.. 

1986 Ari Roussimoff & I created the TSNY - Ari made a feature movie - Shadows In The City- I was the art director = very dark - many actors from the TSNY Dian Falk, David Hayes, - as well as LES - including Nick Zedd. Kembra Pfahler, Jack Smith played death- Was this the only narrative film JS acted in?  After film done. Ari moved n Elsa and I ran TSNY-= till legalization.
 

CATALOG   
club57 catalog frontclub57 catalog back

Description: New York’s East Village was alive with artistic activity in the 1970s and ’80s, fueled by low rents, resistance to the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. Club 57, located in the basement of a Polish church at 57 St. Marks Place, began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions and quickly became a center of the neighborhood’s constellation of countercultural venues, with artists such as Keith Haring, Ann Magnuson, Klaus Nomi, Tseng Kwong Chi, John Sex, Fab 5 Freddy, John “Lypsinka” Eppperson, and Lisa Baumgardner.
Fabled but not widely known until now, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake. Published to accompany the first major exhibition to examine this scene-changing alternative space in full, Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 features rarely seen artwork, film stills, photographs, posters, flyers, and zines to create a uniquely detailed portrait of unbridled creativity before the dawn of the digital age.

Details: Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978-1983 | By Ron Magliozzi and Sophie Cavoulacos, 2017 | Hardcover, 184 pages | 10.5 x 9” | ISBN 9781633450301 | 40$
 

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